When voters head to the polls in November, they won't just be deciding on U.S. senators, members of Congress, governors and other elected officials. They'll also be voting on a number of far-reaching marijuana ballot initiatives.

A White House drug office official has offered assurances that a marijuana policy panel will be objective and dispassionate as it examines the impact of legalization in some states, a Colorado senator said.

With the midterm elections on the horizon, it’s a good time to spotlight those who have taken the most notable positions on marijuana policy, both positive and negative.

In a little over a month, Americans will head to the voting booths to vote in a very important midterm election that will have major impact on control of Congress and the Donald Trump presidency.

It's the latest in a series of clashes between U.S. and state laws around the country that came out in favor of medical marijuana users trying to keep or obtain jobs with drug-testing employers.

Though medical marijuana is legal in most states, the Department of Veterans Affairs will neither recommend nor prescribe it because of a longstanding federal law.

Cannabis legalization goes before the voters in a number of states on Nov. 6.

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