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New York Marijuana News and Politics

U.S. Senators

Gillibrand, Kirsten E. - (D - NY) 

478 Russell Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510

(202) 224-4451

Contact: www.gillibrand.senate.gov/contact/ 

 

Schumer, Charles E. - (D - NY) 

322 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510

(202) 224-6542

Contact: www.schumer.senate.gov/contact/email-chuck 

Sen. Schumer is up for re-election in 2016

 

Marijuana Policy Project on New York:

Last update: November 12, 2015

On July 5, 2014, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed a limited medical marijuana bill into law, which included several revisions he insisted upon. After 18 years of work, led by tireless Assemblyman Richard Gottfried, New York became the 23rd state with an effective medical marijuana law. The program is supposed to be operational once the Commissioner of Health and the Superintendent of State Police have certified that it can be implemented in accordance with public health and safety interests — and not before January 5, 2016. The health department’s FAQ on the program is available here.

While it’s an important step forward, the law falls short in several areas — it leaves out several serious conditions, will not allow patients to smoke cannabis, and allows very few producers and dispensaries. In early spring 2015, the Department of Health issued regulations to implement the law, which Assemblyman Gottfried explained were needlessly restrictive and “gratuitously cruel.” In October, the Department of Health made mandatory online training available to physicians who will recommend marijuana to patients.

One of the initial law’s flaws was partially remedied on November 11, 2015, when Gov. Cuomo signed a bill allowing expedited access to marijuana for some patients. However, patients still lack legal protections, and it remains unlikely that medical marijuana will be available to any patients before January.

Many thanks to all the patients, loved ones, legislators, supporters, donors, and organizations — including Compassionate Care New York — whose tireless work led to the enactment of New York’s medical marijuana law and who continue to work to improve the program.

New York City to finally comply with 1977 decrim

New York was one of the first states in the nation to decriminalize the possession of marijuana. Unfortunately, in recent years, the “public view” exception to New York’s 1977 decriminalization law has been widely abused by police officers. New York City police have told tens of thousands of people, mostly young people of color, to empty their pockets — thus making them criminals once their marijuana was in public view.

Finally, however, the tide is turning. Last July, Brooklyn district attorney Ken Thompson announced his office would stop prosecuting low-level marijuana possession cases. In November 2014, Mayor Bill DeBlasio followed suit, ordering the New York Police Department to stop arresting people for marijuana possession and instead issue civil citations. This will finally bring the city police in line with state law since 1977.

Still, Sen. Liz Krueger and Assemblywoman Crystal Peoples-Stokes have proposed a more comprehensive fix to New York’s unfair and wasteful marijuana laws — legalizing marijuana for adults and regulating it like alcohol.

New York Cannabis News

 

 

New York is now open for hemp growers. At least, it's open to 10 hemp growers.

SYRACUSE, N.Y. -- A new type of medical practice has sprouted up in the Syracuse area that's promoting something most doctors cannot give patients – pot.

ALBANY — Moving to address complaints about New York’s new medical marijuana program, the state’s Health Department is making substantial changes to expand access to the drug, including allowing home delivery, quite likely by the end of September.

A farm in central New York is the first to legally grow hemp in 80 years as part of a new pilot program to explore hemp's industrial use.