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New Mexico Marijuana News and Politics

U.S. Senators

Heinrich, Martin - (D - NM) 

303 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510

(202) 224-5521

Contact: www.heinrich.senate.gov/contact 

 

Udall, Tom - (D - NM) 

531 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510

(202) 224-6621

Contact: www.tomudall.senate.gov/?p=contact

 

Marijuana Policy Project on New Mexico:

Last update: April 15, 2015

New Mexico is one of 23 states (plus D.C.) that have removed criminal penalties for the medical use of marijuana. For information on New Mexico’s medical marijuana program, including information on qualifying conditions and how to become a patient, please visit the New Mexico Health Department’s information page.

For non-medical use, New Mexico’s marijuana laws are less draconian than those of most states. Possession of one ounce or less of marijuana for non-medical purposes is punishable by a $50-100 fine and up to 15 days in jail. A second offense, or a conviction for possession of more than an ounce, can lead to a fine of up to $1,000 and a prison term of up to one year.

However, 19 other states have removed the possibility of jail time, with four of them having legalized marijuana for adults and regulated it like alcohol. In both 2014 and 2015, Sen. Gerald Ortiz y Pino sponsored a resolution to ask voters whether to end marijuana prohibition in New Mexico, replacing it with taxation and regulation. 

New Mexico misses opportunity to decriminalize marijuana

The New Mexico Legislature’s 2015 session ended in late March, and with it died SB 383, a bill that would have decriminalized marijuana throughout the state.

SB 383 would have replaced criminal penalties for possessing up to an ounce of marijuana with a $50 civil fine. It also would have removed the possibility of jail time for possession of up to eight ounces. Although SB 383 passed the Senate with a bipartisan vote, the House did not take it up.

The state legislature failed to act despite a strong call from voters. In November 2014, voters in Santa Fe and Bernalillo Counties — representing 40% of the state’s population — approved advisory questions asking their elected officials to support decriminalization. The questions won with 73% support in Santa Fe County and 59% in Bernalillo County.

New Mexico Cannabis News

 

Overall support in the state for legalizing recreational marijuana grew by just 2 percentage points over the past two years, but more people said they now “strongly support” legalization, according to poll results released Tuesday by the groups that commissioned it.

The Albuquerque City Council has voted to decriminalize marijuana possession in small amounts and send the measure to the mayor for final approval.

Two Albuquerque city councilors are pushing to decriminalize marijuana possession in cases where a person is caught with an ounce (28 grams) or less, saying their proposal will free up police time and resources to focus on more serious crimes.

The state House of Representatives on Tuesday passed yet another bill that would legalize research on industrial hemp.